we-are-terrible-at-recognizing-other-people's-faces:-security-with-our-id-photo-is-a-danger

We are terrible at recognizing other people's faces: security with our ID photo is a danger

We are terrible recognizing other people’s faces: security with our ID photo is a danger

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We are terrible at recognizing other people’s faces: security with our ID photo is a danger

We are terrible recognizing other people’s faces: security with our ID photo is a danger We have explained the details of the news, step by step, below. We are lousy recognizing other people’s faces: security with our ID photo is a danger Keep reading our news. Here are all the details on the subject.

We are terrible recognizing other people’s faces: security with our ID photo is a danger

One of the most outstanding events of the news last week was the case of Juan Luis de Soto , the man who lost his ID in 2019 and after two months some thieves used his document to buy three cars and ask for eight credits from the Bank. It cost him God and help to prove that they were impersonating him. After the thieves, a whole mafia specialized in this type of crime was uncovered. As shown by the frequent notices of the Spanish Data Protection Agency (AEPD) , it is a type of scam that is not strange, neither in our country nor in other countries around the world.

This has led scholars such as the psychologist Guido Corradi , to say that “identification by photo is a measure of the last century” , a claim that supports with a battery of peer-reviewed studies in recent years that corroborate that, despite the fact that we see it as a harmless process, given its ubiquity and the naturalness with which we apply it in our day-to-day lives, it is an important hole in citizen and financial security: “We have experimental evidence of that a) we are bad at recognizing photos and faces ; b) we believe that we are not; c) the usual practice (customs, banks, etc.) worsens our recognition ”, says Corradi.

A study from the University of Louisiana shows that the comparison of faces for passports and DNIs is highly fallible, with “error rates between the 10 and the 20% under ideal conditions of replicability ”, which, they warn, does not occur in the real world when you have to do this type of facial review, when you can have huge queues of people and you process 200 or 300 faces in one day.

In addition, according to their tests, if someone’s photo was tried to match another photo (for example, that of a DNI with the digital image of a security camera) repeatedly, respondents were more likely to be suspicious of the image already report the non-coincidence to a greater degree. But if the objective to be analyzed was infrequent and did not go through the system many times, the respondents obtained higher error rates, around 40%, even if the pollsters asked them if they were sure of their choice.

A later work of the same University went a little further: the performance of three groups was analyzed: 800 collegiate notaries, 70 bank tellers and 35 University students. The plan was to see what effects the veteran could have. Spoiler: none, or rather, none good. The highest correlation of success was not obtained by those with more experience, in reverse: the only relevant correlation that occurred in all the tests was that, the younger the subject surveyed, the higher the percentage of success, according to the researchers, perhaps because Cognitive decline is a determining factor before this task.

This means that work experience in the field of facial recognition does not help to better recognize cases of identity theft. Louisianans acknowledge that previous work has shown a field where experience did work: forensic examiners apparently do better than novices, but this is because these workers do receive satisfactory training in the comparison of images and have better conditions to analyze the faces of the subjects, while in jobs As a notary public, security guards and customs, who work in rapidly changing environments, the only training given is life experience (which, as we have seen, is of no help).

In fact, it could happen that this work practice is counterproductive : when there is a Fraudulent identity theft by erroneous facial recognition, the employee never or almost never finds out that he has made that mistake (the scammer will not warn him of his mistake), and therefore never receives signals that this is a complicated task or that You are performing poorly, which may lead you to become overconfident.

In almost all studies, scientists recognize that there is one type of person, the “super-identifiers” , who are very good at evaluating faces and are so consistently throughout their lives. They are people who have that talent, but that talent is often not part of the aptitudes evaluated to access those positions where they have to practice it so much.

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