terabits-per-second-in-airdrop,-this-is-what-a-new-patent-suggests:-rumorsfera

Terabits per second in AirDrop, this is what a new patent suggests: Rumorsfera

Terabits per second in AirDrop, this is what a new patent suggests: Rumorsfera

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Terabits per second in AirDrop, this is what a new patent suggests: Rumorsfera

Terabits per second in AirDrop, this is what a new patent suggests: Rumorsfera We have explained the details of the news, step by step, below. Terabits per second in AirDrop, this is what a new patent suggests: Rumorsfera Keep reading our news. Here are all the details on the subject.

Terabits per second in AirDrop, this is what a new patent suggests: Rumorsfera

High-speed file transfer is becoming more and more important in our daily lives. There are already several protocols that allow interesting speeds, but what the recently registered patent by Apple raises goes much further: terabits per second .

A terabyte of information in just eight seconds

The transfer of information through the mechanisms that we currently know has certain speed limitations that are linked to the physics of these media. Much fewer restrictions have the use of light to transfer information . This is nothing new, we all have fiber optics in our homes. What is new is the system proposed by Apple to use light to transfer information between different devices in an optimal way.

The most delicate part of the transfer of information through light without using a wire is the alignment between the emitter and the receiver . In this regard, Apple explains that any less than perfect alignment has an impact on a significant drop in transfer speed.

“A device Electronic may include a free space optical communication system to transmit, receive, or exchange data wirelessly with another electronic device. In some cases, the optical communication system may be configured to be directional (eg, line of sight) with for the purpose of increasing data transfer rates, increasing data transfer privacy or for any other suitable purpose. ”

“However, a conventional free-space directional optical communication system is exceptionally dependent on the precise alignment of communication devices. As such, conventional free-space optical communication systems cannot be incorporated into portable electronic devices. which can be moved or repositioned from time to time. ” And this is exactly what the patent aims to solve. Apple has invented a system of moving heads that allow high precision alignment . In a few words we can describe the system as follows. After establishing contact, although not in an optimal position, communication between both devices is opened. From here, one of them moves the transmitter while transferring data and waits for the other device to detect the position with the best transfer speed. Then it is the other device that is repositioned.

A high speed and high privacy system with many possible applications.

With this simple idea, the system achieves the maximum connection speed and begins the transfer of information. A transfer that, given its directionality, implies much greater privacy than the systems we currently use . It is very different, in this sense, to emit a signal in all directions, as a Wi-Fi network can do for example, or to emit a pulse aimed only centimeters from another device.

“A directional free-space optical communication system can facilitate higher data transfer rates (eg, tens of gigabits per second to terabits per second), higher data transfer privacy data and increased data transfer security relative to conventional device-to-device data communication protocols such as Wi-Fi, near-field communications, or Bluetooth. ”

As we always say, patents can take a long time to become on a real device, if they do. However, they always offer us a vision of the interests of the company. In this case in the field of wireless communication and its speed.

Image | Umberto

Via | Patently Apple