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Microsoft tried to negotiate an exclusive deal with Apple to bring its xCloud games to the App Store

Microsoft tried to negotiate an exclusive agreement with Apple to bring its xCloud games to the App Store

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Microsoft tried to negotiate an exclusive deal with Apple to bring its xCloud games to the App Store

Microsoft tried to negotiate an exclusive agreement with Apple to bring its xCloud games to the App Store We have explained the details of the news, step by step, below. Microsoft tried to negotiate an exclusive deal with Apple to bring its xCloud games to the App Store Keep reading our news. Here are all the details on the subject.

Microsoft tried to negotiate an exclusive deal with Apple to bring its xCloud games to the App Store

The soap opera streaming game services have brought a new episode. Thanks to The Verge and the judgment of the Epic Games lawsuit against the App Store , we know that Microsoft tried to negotiate special conditions for put your Xbox games on the App Store . Finally, that never happened, but in this installment we get a little closer to knowing the reasons for the outcome.

Business model clash between Microsoft and Apple

Microsoft was willing to agree to much of Apple’s demands. It even offered to bring its xbox-exclusive triple-A games to the iPhone to sweeten the deal. This is according to several private emails unearthed by The Verge following Epic’s lawsuit against Apple. According to the emails retrieved by the publication, both companies were trading in February of 2020 the way to bring xCloud to the App Store . Apparently Microsoft was willing to create individual apps for each game, although it wanted them to be “shortcuts”. The company proposed this option although at first it opposed putting its games individually.

The idea was to have a main app of about 150 MB, accompanied by those shortcuts of a few 30 MB each. This would allow updates to focus on the main app instead of the others, adding convenience to the user according to Microsoft. Apple denied this possibility, asking that each app be “complete” and not a simple shortcut.

But the emails indicate that Microsoft’s entire proposal was scrapped because of how it handled IAP purchases for each game. An end confirmed by Apple, according to The Verge. While Microsoft or offered the possibility of buying the Xbox Game Pass Ultimate , the Redmond preferred to manage their purchases within the games and do accounts with Apple afterwards. The intention was not to skip the App Store commission, but to “save work on a repetitive API”.

And this is where the business model clash between Apple and Microsoft occurs . What Microsoft was asking was to have a special agreement to be able to manage IAPs, when that is something not allowed by the rules of the App Store.

Flexibility for new services respecting the App Store

Finally, xCloud did not reach the iPhone in September 2020, As planned.

    Microsoft decided to prioritize a solution via Safari that came out last June , as it is not subject to the rules of the App Store . Watching this episode, it is clear that there are two main themes:

    • The way in which the games of a streaming service are presented to the user.
    • The way in which the monetization of these services is managed.

    It is clear that the first can be framed within the natural evolution of the App Store, where changes are made in those categories that need it. Unlike what many believe, the Apple App Store is not an immovable monolith . It has grown and evolved with the times, sometimes leading the vanguard and other times, as on this occasion, waiting for the development of events. Ideally, for everyone, users, developers and Apple, is that the company leave clear rules from the beginning. But that’s not always possible.

    The incipient sector of video game streaming is yet to be explored and Apple is taking its steps very cautiously

    As game streaming is a relatively recent technology and with numerous technical and monetization implications, Apple prefers to take small steps . It was in September of 2000 when he unveiled a series of specific rules for game streaming services , although not enough to accommodate Microsoft’s service.

    At Buzz we still think that services like xCloud or Stadia should have their site on the App Store . But also that is legitimate for Apple to seek to protect the interests of its business model.