is-there-inequality-in-the-operating-room?-according-to-a-study,-yes:-women-die-more-when-operated-on-by-a-man

Is there inequality in the operating room? According to a study, yes: women die more when operated on by a man

Is there inequality in the operating room? According to a study, yes: women die more when operated on by a man

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Is there inequality in the operating room? According to a study, yes: women die more when operated on by a man

Is there inequality in the operating room? According to a study, yes: women die more when operated on by a man We have explained the details of the news, step by step, below. Is there inequality in the operating room? According to a study, yes: women die more when operated on by a man Keep reading our news. Here are all the details on the subject.

Is there inequality in the operating room? According to a study, yes: women die more when operated on by a man

Surgery is a male-dominated profession, and for years it has been argued that “implicit sexual bias” could be behind the results. In Europe, almost nine out of ten tenured surgeons are men. Several investigations have even revealed that women who are operated on by a male surgeon are much more likely to die, experience complications and be readmitted to the hospital than when a woman performs the procedure.

The study. An investigation published in the medical journal JAMA Surgery points out that women have a 14% more likely to suffer a disease result and a 20% more likely to die when a man rather than a woman performs the surgery. In general, the patients also had a % higher risk of complications; a 11% higher risk of readmission; and a 20 % more likely to have to stay longer in the hospital. This did not happen the other way around.

To arrive at these results, the authors of the study analyzed the records of 1.320.320 patients in Ontario who underwent 14 common surgical procedures performed by 2.375 surgeons. These ranged from hip and knee replacements and weight loss surgery to removal of an appendix or gallbladder and more complicated operations such as a bypass. Cardiac, aneurysm repair and brain surgery.

Why? Technical differences between male and female surgeons are unlikely to explain the findings, as both sexes receive the same technical medical training. However, research suggests that one possible explanation may be “implicit sexual bias”, in which surgeons “act on deep-seated subconscious biases, stereotypes and attitudes”.

Differences in men’s and women’s communication and interpersonal skills evident in surgeons’ conversations with patients before the operation is performed may also be a factor. And differences between the work style, decision making and judgment of male and female doctors.

Other explanations. Several female surgeons have tried to explain in this BBC report some of the reasons that may also be behind. Oneeka Williams, a urologist at Tufts University, USA, doesn’t make definitive statements about why female patients may fare worse with male surgeons, but notes that “men think women are more anxious and hysterical and, as As such, they pay less attention to postoperative complaints. It also suggests that there may be a significant difference in pain perception: “male physicians underestimate the severity of symptoms in female patients.”

Discrimination in the work area. They also point out the differences in attitudes towards male and female surgeons. “During the operation, we know that female surgeons are punished for poor results. They are more likely to have a drop in their referrals, are less likely to be forgiven for a poor result, and these are attributed to their skill, while in male surgeons, poor results are attributed to chance, to bad luck. So women have to perform better to be considered equal”, they point out.

A profession full of men. The 86% of senior surgeons are men. Surgery is still a long 2786671far from having gender balance in its workforce. The women represent the 21% of early-stage surgeons, but only 30% of the top trainees and the 14% of the consultants. The lack of flexibility in surgical training schedules and shifts could explain why many women do not become consultant surgeons.

Controversy. Gender discrimination in a field that is dominated by men has long been recognized and can be a factor in women leaving the profession. In 2015, the surgeons took to Twitter to challenge this situation with the slogan #ILookLikeaSurgeon (#meveocomocirujano). Still today, the hashtag has many messages about how women in the profession are routinely mistaken for a different role, with almost anything other than a surgeon.

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