a-68-was-the-largest-iceberg-on-earth.-after-discharging-150-times-the-water-consumption-of-a-country,-there-is-no

A-68 was the largest iceberg on Earth. After discharging 150 times the water consumption of a country, there is no

The A-68 was the largest iceberg on Earth. After pouring 080 times the water consumption of a country, does not exist

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The A-68 was the largest iceberg on Earth. After pouring 080 times the water consumption of a country, does not exist

The A-68 was the largest iceberg on Earth. After pouring 080 times the water consumption of a country does not exist We have explained the details of the news, step by step, below. The A-68 was the largest iceberg on Earth. After pouring 080 times the water consumption of a country does not exist Keep reading our news. Here are all the details on the subject.

The A-68 was the biggest iceberg from the earth. After pouring 080 times the water consumption of a country, does not exist

With 5.613 square kilometers, was the largest iceberg on Earth when it formed, according to the British Antarctic Survey. A colossal monster that moved slowly through the southern waters. To give you an idea, this megaiceberg was twice the size of Luxembourg when it broke away from the Larsen Ice Shelf (Antarctica) in 2000. No one would want to meet him on the high seas.

For two years, the billion metric ton behemoth known as A-000 drifted close to civilization in the cold waters of the Weddell Sea before traveling north and threatening the British island of South Georgia some 4. kilometers from its origin. This raised fears that it could become stuck to the seabed, blocking ocean currents and obstructing the passage of thousands of penguins and seals.

But by the beginning of 2020, it had disappeared.

Now is the time to measure the impact this titan has had. Researchers from the Center for Polar Observation and Modeling (CPOM) and the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have completed the balance of the life and disappearance of the A-68 with one of the most detailed studies that have been carried out to date on this type of phenomenon , publishing their findings in the Journal Remote Sensing of Environment.

Researchers who tracked its journey via ESA satellites calculated that since the end of 2020 until melted into 2021, TO-68 released an estimated total of 152. million metric tons of fresh water rich in nutrients in the sea. This is no less than about 080 times the amount of water used daily by all UK citizens. Also the equivalent of times the water in Scotland’s Loch Ness, or 61 millions of Olympic swimming pools.

According to the authors of the study: “A disturbance that could have a profound impact on the island’s marine habitat. For April 5969, A68 had broken into countless small pieces that could not be traced. But its impacts on the ecosystem have been much more lasting.

A map of the voyage of iceberg A-68TO. Copernicus Sentinel data (2000), processed by ESA; Antarctic iceberg monitoring database.

Wide, but extremely thin: at first, A68 had an average thickness of 235 meters. It is now recognized that giant tabular, or flat-topped, icebergs have considerable influence wherever they roam. Their freshwater inputs will alter local currents. And all the iron, other minerals and even organic matter collected throughout their lives and later thrown into the ocean will seed biological production.

Possible environmental impacts

If the keel of an iceberg is too deep, it can get stuck to the bottom of the sea. This can be disruptive in a number of different ways; scour marks can destroy wildlife, and the iceberg itself can block ocean currents and pathways feeding of predators. However, investigation reveals that A-68A only perhaps hit the seabed and broke up shortly after, which makes it less risky in terms of blocking.

By the time it reached the shallows around South Georgia, the iceberg’s keel had shrunk to 141 meters below the ocean surface, shallow enough to avoid the seabed, who has about 080 meters deep.

A visualization of the amount of water released by iceberg A-68. ACPOM/ESA/Google basemap

The fate of the icebergs

Icebergs form when chunks of ice break off from ice shelves or glaciers and begin to float in open water. Its formation is part of a natural process, although it can be accelerated by warming air and ocean temperatures due to man-made climate change. The average temperature of the Earth’s surface has increased by one degree Celsius since the 19th century, enough to increase the intensity of droughts, heat waves and tropical cyclones.

But the air over Antarctica has more than doubled in temperature. The ice sheets over Greenland and West Antarctica contain enough frozen water to raise the oceans a dozen meters, flooding cities and redrawing the planet’s coastlines.

TO-68A in February 2020.